I can’t tell you how much this podcast resonated with me, especially during these unusual times we are experiencing. I had an opportunity to discuss Pulmonary Hygiene with Nina Bausek, and seriously, it just makes so much sense! Who even knew you could exercise your diaphragm? Not me! And for someone who has been asthmatic all my life the question arises, why have I never been offered the opportunity or the information to know that I can exercise my diaphragm? Breath easier? This podcast has changed my life, and now I want to share the information I have learn with you. Oh, and there’s a whole lot more to learn!

Nina Bausek

Nina Bausek chats Pulmonary Hygiene

Trish Hammond
Good morning listeners. It’s Trish Hammond here from the transforming bodies podcast. And today I’m going to be speaking about something really, really interesting to me, and I think is very relevant at the moment, I’ll be speaking with Nina. Basically, we’re going to talk about pulmonary hygiene. I’m getting Nina to explain to you who she is, but she runs a website called “Luft for Life”. And pretty much when I came across, I was really excited because in these times of, you know, CV-19, I think it’s really important for us to understand, you know, – I didn’t know this but breathing basically you use a muscle so it’s up to us to kind of get that muscle working. So there are things out there that can help us with exercising our breathing muscles, but I’m going to switch straight over to Nina and she can tell us all about it. So welcome, Nina. Now you’re in Vienna?

Nina
Hi, Trish, thank you very much for having me. No, it’s I’m a half an hour away from Vienna. I’m in Austria.

Trish Hammond
And you guys have been locked down for a full month now, haven’t you?

Nina
I think we’re in week five or something.

Trish Hammond
Yeah. Wow. So it must be crazy times over there! So today you’re going to tell us about pulmonary hygiene. First of all, tell us tell us your background. Nina.

Nina
Okay. And I’m a geneticist by background and have worked in research for I think 12 years in academia, really doing unrelated stuff with flies and chickens and working in the fields of production. And after doing that, about five years ago, I changed into the respiratory field working for a company called PM Medical – They are in Florida. And I’m still working as the chief scientist there. And they have the founder of PM medical is a woman called Peggy Nicholson, who is a respiratory therapist. And she invented 40 years ago, she invented the first respiratory muscle trainer, which is called the breather. And that’s kind of how I got into the whole breathing field. And we’re still working with this device. It’s a really popular device and has been sold more than 1.2 million times since then. And, and we’re doing clinical studies we’re providing for people with COPD, with asthma, with heart failure, as well as for athletes and help them with the breathing. And, as you mentioned, I also have my own company now called luft for life that’s here in Europe. And we’re also working with respiratory muscle devices. We’re working with the breather, and we’re working With another device which is actually an Australia device called the Air physio, and that’s a device that you only exhale against. But in general, kind of the breathing field is kind of what I got into and I really enjoy it.

Trish Hammond
Yeah, well, it’s really interesting cuz I’m asthmatic. Do you know why something like this is not available to every asthmatic in the world or anyone who suffers from sleep apnoea? Like why don’t we know about it? I was so surprised when I found out that there was anything like that because I’ve had asthma since I was 10. So for over 40 years, no one’s ever mentioned anything like this to me, so I was quite blown away when I realised you can get devices to help you to, you know, exercise your breathing muscle.

Nina
It is really And, this is because what these respirator muscle training devices do, they work on the underlying condition which is respiratory muscle weakness. So like any other muscle weakness, your respiratory muscles can be too weak, and in many people they are and that’s because even if you exercise, even if you’re a runner, or if you do other exercise to training your respiratory muscles as well but not in isolation, so even then they might not be as good as they could be. And if you if you have a normal, you know, non athletic life or you’re just doing recreational sports and you sitting a lot, then the diaphragm which is your main breathing muscle doesn’t get used, you know, it is for the diaphragm sits it’s a massive muscle it sits underneath your rib cage and it kind of separates your thoracic cavity up here from your abdominal abdominal cavity. And what it does when you breathe in it kind of it’s dome shaped and when you breathe in, the whole muscle moves downwards into your belly and kind of pulls the lungs down and really increases the surface of your lungs. And when you breathe diaphragmatically, this is what happens, the diaphragm moves down and you increase the surface of your lungs, you increase the space that the alveoli have, these are the little bubbles where the gas exchange actually takes place or where the oxygen gets into the body, and the carbon dioxide gets out. And this is why this muscle is so important. But most people these days actually don’t use it. They are chest breathers. You see that really often, especially when you’re when we’re stressed with chest breathers and we don’t use our main breathing muscle anymore. And this is why it becomes weak, but that it has become weak is under recognized even by most clinicians. If you have asthma, they might treat your symptoms. They say you know, if you have, if you can’t breathe, take an inhaler, which immediately kind of opens up your lungs, but it doesn’t treat the underlying condition. So I’m with you, I think Everybody should be doing it because it’s such a simple thing to work your muscle like you would work any other muscle, you know, problems in your back, you work your back muscles, you know, if you want to get stronger legs, you work your leg muscle leg muscles, if you’ve got a weak diaphragm, they give you an inhaler because make sense. I’m with you.

Trish Hammond
It’s really crazy because I don’t understand why they don’t say here’s a prescription for your inhaler, And he is a little device that can help you to exercise your breathing muscle like why wouldn’t that be? You know?

Nina
Yeah. And it’s with, you know, with COPD, and heart failure patients, they’re like the biggest patient population, they really suffer from respiratory muscle weakness, and the biggest and the most burdensome symptom of COPD and heart failure is dyspnea that really is the breathlessness and this is what what they what these patients find the hardest thing to deal with because there It comes with the Panic of not having having enough air, and there is no pharmacological solution for this, there is nothing you can do, you can use an inhaler, which kind of solves the problem for minutes. Or you can use oxygen, which most COPD patients have. But still for most of these patients that clinicians are not aware that they can actually give them a device that trains the respiratory muscle makes them stronger and reduces this now.

Trish Hammond
Yeah, cuz like for me, the most frightening thing is the thought of dying without being able to take a breath because I know what it’s like to have asthma, just not being able to get enough air in to take in. Even now just thinking about it makes me anxious to take enough air in to get that breath It’s really bloody scary.

Nina
Yeah, and you know, the anxiousness, the anxiousness that comes with it and the anxiety that of course, kind of enhances the symptoms of it. So you need to and you need to kind of the breathing exercises that you get Using CRISPR to master training, the diaphragmatic breathing, which really activates and resets your breathing pattern that is so important that you learn how to breathe properly again, to activate the breathing muscles that you should be using.

Trish Hammond
Yeah, yeah, but that makes so much sense. So to me, it’s like I notice it’s got a big influence on your body and and you’re saying to me before that it somehow it can influence the hormones as well that are produced. And you were saying that was about how, you know, anxiety regulates your breath. Can you kind of explain that

Nina
Yeah, this is the way you breathe. So babies who are born they automatically breathe diaphragmatically so yes, if you look at the sleeping baby, the belly goes out when it breathes in and the belly goes in if you breathe out, so this is the proper diaphragmatic breathing you really see the belly move and and this is the natural Way of breathing. And as you get older most people start to use the chest more than the belly for breathing. This is the stress response because our lives tend to be quite stressful and you can’t get into the habit of just breathing with your accessory muscles, you’ve got loads of accessory breathing muscles along your ribs, and up there and your shoulders around your neck. And you can actually by lifting the shoulders and by using the muscles along your ribs, you’re actually expanding the lungs a little bit to help get the air in and you draw the air in, but you’re not using your main breathing muscle, and then you get kind of dysfunctional breathing and this is the pattern that we see in most people. And this is you and this tells the body constantly that it is in stress. Because this is the stress breathing we breathe up there many people also hyperventilate. With shallow breathing, it’s really inefficient. So you need to get a lot of air in because you constantly, your body feels like it doesn’t get enough oxygen. And also because the body thinks it’s in stress, it actually prepares for the flight or fright mode. So it expects that it has to start running now. So your breathing rate is increased. And this tells the body that it’s in stress, but it also stresses the body even more, because it doesn’t actually get enough oxygen in and it doesn’t actually get the carbon dioxide out that is produced. So that means that you end up with more carbon dioxide in your body than you need. And it’s kind of – it’s a vicious circle but the good thing is that breathing works of course unconsciously you go to sleep, you still breathe, but you can also regulate it consciously. So you can train how to breathe, you can train the breathing pattern, you can stop breathing. You can do this with the heart but you can do this with our respiratory system, we can actually stop breathing, we can decide that we take a long breath in a long breath out. So we can totally retrain the breathing pattern. And by doing this, you really do experience a lot of benefits, you know, just by you can base the balance between the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous system. So the sympathetic nervous system is, again, it’s the fight and flight response, the stress response, the parasympathetic nervous system, that’s the one that’s really for the internal organs that when you’re relaxed, then this is activated, and this is what we want more of just to get rid of this threat – stressed, calm down the body, calm down the heart rate. And this really goes by the breathing if you exhale longer. For example, if you take a deep breath in, and then take a really nice long exhale, with diaphragmatic breathing that activates the vagus nerve and the vagus nerve then activates the persons parasympathetic nervous system. And that’s the state you want to be in, that immediately reduces the stress response. It also reduces inflammatory responses, for example, because with the stress response, the body also prepares for injury. So your immune system is constantly alert, because injury might occur, you know, you’re preparing for a fight and flight response with the breathing, you can regulate this whole system and calm the whole system down again. Yeah, and also with that kind of regulate a little bit, the hormone response that you’re getting.

Trish Hammond
So the right way to breathe in and like, I’m going to do this while I’m talking to you because I’m a very practical person. So basically, the proper way to breathe is when you breathe in, your stomach should come out

Nina
Yeah, when you breathe in, your stomach inflates.

Trish Hammond
It’s so hard though.

Nina 21:00
Yeah, this should be your natural way of breathing. Really, Yeah, this is why, but it’s kind of just to bring the awareness that the first point that you should do is just bring the awareness to how you’re breathing. Just kind of observe yourself. Are you breathing shallowly? Are you breathing? Does you belly barely move at all? If you’re breathing or not? Do you usually sit upright or you’re hunched forward, you just kind of observe all of this or are you a mouth breather or are you a nose breather. And then kind of slowly, you can train yourself to proper habits to breathe through the nose if you can, especially in times of, you know, respiratory pathogens flying around. You want to breathe through the nose and you want to do big diaphragmatic breaths. Kind of the belly should inflate when you inhale and deflate when you exhale.

Trish Hammond
That makes so much sense.

Nina
Makes sense because the air goes in, it’s kind of you need the space, you’re creating more space by that.

Trish Hammond
Yeah, right. I’m gonna practice that. So tell me so if someone was to look, is there a time that it would take to kind of, you know, fix up your breathing or like, Is it just something that you just need to do all the time? Like, you go to the gym and you build your muscles, is this something that we should just be doing all the time as a conscious thing to get our health in check.

Nina
Yeah, I think the first thing that you do is your new really, the more aware you are, the more aware of you become you know, when you start noticing how you breathe, you also start noticing if, when things go wrong, you start noticing when suddenly you start hyperventilating again, or, for example, if you can’t, to calm down at night, you know, you can also it’s quite often that you lie in bed, you can’t sleep and then you start observing your breathing pattern and you realize you’re Actually panting almost. And then there are different strategies for that as well. And we’ve been collaborating with Shane and Angie Saunders, they’re actually in Australia as well. And they are breathing trainers and they work with different shapes of wheezing, they have a circular breathing pattern where you For example, breathe in and breathe out without pause. So you link those breaths together. And that kind of catches up with the stress that goes with, for example, a racing heart. You know, if you lie in bed and you can’t quite calm down, you can’t stop your racing mind. That’s a really good breathing exercise to kind of catch up with the stress and then take your breathing and then slow it down to a triangle shape to inhale, exhale, pause. That’s the normal resting state that you need to calm your body down. You want to inhale, you want to exhale and then you want to pause that’s calming, breathing that’s calming down the nervous system, And that kind of brings the body to rest and that’s if you have this breathing pattern then all the stress responses are reduced as well in the body, so by regulating your breath you can constantly kind of regulate the stress answer that or this the stress response that your body’s is is having.

Trish Hammond
And you were mentioning as well like Tell me about people with sleep disorders like um, you know, because I know that these breathing trainers are helpful for people who have sleep problems and then you also telling me you know like about when you drink alcohol at three o’clock the morning you wake up so I know you’ve got another like a it’s similar to a Fitbit or an iWatch, you keep it on all the time, even when you sleep. And can you explain because I’m really excited about that one as well because I know that I’m menopausa; and I toss and turn all night, but I would love to actually be able to track that so that I could make that better or, you know, work on techniques to make that better. So how can how can that help with that?

Nina
Yeah, this is called the bio strap. That’s a little thing that I’m working with and that I’m wearing. And I’ve had this on for, I think more than a year now. And I really like it. It’s what measures your respiratory rate, your heart rate, your heart rate variability, and your oxygen saturation. And it also during the night, it records when you’re in deep sleep and when you’re in light sleep, so it kind of gives you a really good indication of how much did you sleep? How much did you really sleep like what percentage of that was deep sleep? Where your brain is really recovering? How often did you wake up? It also measures your movements, how much did you move during the night you know, were you really tossing and turning the whole night, or were you only tossing and turning for like an hour. And it just kind of because you were in light sleep then is this kind of what appears to for you that it seemed like it was the whole night. So you really get a good indication of the quantity and the quality of your sleep, as well as the recovery rate. And this is where the heart rate variability comes in. So that’s the heart rate variability measures essentially, the difference between your different heartbeats, you know, it’s never your heartbeat that is rhythmic. But the duration between each single heartbeat differs slightly. And this difference is measured and it gives an indication of your recovery rate overnight. And this is something that you can also really feel if you tune into but it just gives you a bit of an opportunity to tune into your body because sometimes you wake up in the morning you think I’ve had seven hours of sleep, why do I feel so bad? And then, you can look at it at how you’ve slept and you see My heart rate variability has not recovered at all. And this might be because I worked until I went to bed till midnight. And I was sitting in front of the computer without I mean I’m wary without for example wearing blue lens filters, that’s what I’m wearing. Now the glasses are just for the blue, just like blue light filters. And, if I don’t wear them, I can definitely tell that my sleep is getting worse just because my body thinks it’s daylight and just lit up you know, you’ve been drinking alcohol, you’ve been you’ve had a big meal, these things just kind of, you still get the quantity of sleep but you don’t get the quality of sleep anymore. You don’t get the recovery rate. And by monitoring this, you can just learn a lot about yourself because it’s direct feedback. And next morning, you can see Oh, for example, when I drink alcohol I wake up between three and four in the morning and that’s the time where the liver regenerates. And obviously my liver woke me up so it and it’s just, yeah, it tells you a lot about what you can improve about your sleep hygiene or about your lifestyle. If I exercise more, I can sleep better. That’s a direct you know, directly tell. Last October I started running again and my heart rate variability score just went up and my recovery rate overnight just went up just because cardio exercise does that to your body. So it gives you direct feedback without needing a personal trainer.

Trish Hammond
Yeah, of course. And also, I think, but I like them. I like the sound of it because it’s like another form of like learning about your body. I can’t believe we like it’s almost like the stuff that we should be learning when we’re children just as a natural thing, but we kind of get it knocked out of ourselves and we learn it later when you know when something goes wrong or whatever. So it’s almost like if we can teach ourselves now and teach our children this And hopefully it will, it’ll be not so much about living a longer life but living a, you know, a better life a more, you know, a more breath fulfilled life, I guess,

Nina
For want of a better word, a more resilient one. I think if you are just more in tune with how you recovering how your body is doing your, I think you can detect infections early and you can kind of optimize your immune system, you can just kind of try things that work for you to keep you resilient. You know, how much sleep Do I need to function properly, for example? And do I need to go to bed now myself, I know if I go to bed at midnight, that my quality of sleep is much worse than when I go to bed at 11. But for someone who’s a real night owl that might be totally different. So it’s kind of like it tells you those things about yourself because they’re not the same for every person.

Trish Hammond
Yeah, that’s true. So you learn what’s right for you and you can change things around and You’re absolutely right. Because I know for a fact myself, like, I feel like I tossed around all night. But do did stay up quite late on my computer and I don’t have a blue screen. I know when i’m in front of my computer, then i shut up, then go to bed. I think, God, I better go to bed because it’s getting late and then I have a shitty night’s sleep. So, obviously, if I can track that, well, then I can backtrack and see, you know what I was doing before bed and okay, so tonight, I know what I’m going to do. And I’m going to try and get a good night’s sleep.

Nina
Yeah, you know, it might actually be because what I’ve discovered what works for me is just kind of take 10 minutes and do something that calms me down read a book or something or, you know, just breathing exercise, just something that calms me down rather than going to bed straight away. Because I think I need to sleep I need to go to bed now. I need to sleep now. And that just kind of triggers the stress responses and then I’m kind of nervous, you know, anxious about not sleeping, which is totally counterproductive.

Trish Hammond
So this is totally off the thing, but do you think it’s okay? Because like, I know, for for myself like I’m one of those people that wakes up in the morning, like when the day’s here, I can’t wait to get up. And sometimes I’m like, Oh, I can’t, it’s only four o’clock, I better lie down. It’s only, you know, five o’clock. And then well, as soon as five o’clock hits, I’m like, right? That’s it. I’m up, you know? And i never want the day to end, I just want to stay up longer and longer. So, is it okay to like, have a sleep during the day?

Nina
If it works for you, yes.

Trish Hammond
I don’t know, but I just want to try it.

Nina
I think, um, that it also, this kind of depends on how you’re, it’s called circadian rhythm. Mm hmm. Because, you know, it is actually genetically that some people are night owls at some art, and some are early risers. And that’s kind of a little bit in your genes, and you just kind of have to work with that. And you seem to be neither. You seem to want to stay up late and then wake up early and I think you should try this. And whether that helps you whether you can then still sleep at night or whether you’re up, you’re up all night then also, it might be for some people at work that they have to nap early. Like if they have a nap before two o’clock or something, it works. If they have it later, it doesn’t work anymore, and then kind of takes out of their night’s sleep. So that’s just a little bit trial and error. But generally, a power nap during the day for your brain is always a good thing. So you just have to find a space where you’re kind of wake up afterwards, and awake and alert and not totally dizzy and drowsy.

Trish Hammond
Yes, I think because I’ve got an Italian heritage and I think it traditionally the Italians had that siesta in the afternoon and I can remember the first time I went to Italy. I was doing it and I didn’t change anything about the way I lived but I lost weight while I was over there because some I think because maybe that is my what’s it called circadian rhythm?

Nina
Circadian rhythm. Yeah, but it also you know, If you sleep enough, your metabolism kind of works optimally. So you actually need to sleep to metabolize food so it doesn’t actually you can actually kind of sleep yourself thin.

Trish Hammond
Oh my god, I can do something that’s a perfect way to lose weight. I am so interested in the topic and and i think that all of the listeners will be as well and even doctors in their clinics and all that because I’m sure that if people had surgery as well, or have treatments like if, you know, you want to get back on track as soon as you can, and of course when you go under or anything like that your breathing is always affected. So something like this could be really beneficial for doctors and tenants to adopt as well hey, like get your, you know, start getting your breathing in order because it could help you to recover, do you think?

Nina
And then there’s actually that has, there’s really loads of evidence that came out Over the last few years scientific evidence for that, that it’s something called post operative pulmonary complications in operations where you’re intubated. And it’s usually it might be cardiac operations, but it might be any other operations where you are intubated, and where you are at the risk of kind of having mechanical ventilation even for a short amount of time. If you strengthen your respiratory muscles before the operation before you as soon as you know that you’re having an operation, and start using a respiratory muscle trainer, strengthen your inspiratory and expiatory muscles. And it has been shown that you reduce the risk of those post operative pulmonary complications that can be selected as pneumonia. And that’s just because you’re lying down after the operation. And there might be mucus building up in your lungs and you can’t get it out because you’re when you’re lying down, all your muscles get weaker, and your respiratory muscles as well. So then you can’t get the mucosa. And then you might pick up an infection in hospital and pneumonia after an operation is a really, it’s high risk, you know, that’s really not in a state to catch pneumonia then but that’s what happens often. And if you’re strengthening respiratory muscles before the operation has been shown that it reduces that risk by 50%. Then also, also the length of stay in hospital is reduced length of stay in the ICU, so to end up there that’s reduced. And if you should require mechanical ventilation, the duration of mechanical ventilation that’s been shown to be reduced as well. You can strengthen your respiratory muscles before actually the Brita, the respiratory muscle training device that I’m working with. We’re just doing a clinical study in the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. And that’s with people they’re undergoing kind of a bypass surgery for the other part of the heart, the left ventricle, and then ventricular assist devices. It’s kind of a massive pacemaker that you get implanted if you have this and the Patients that really suffer from breathlessness, they’re really dismayed. And that’s one of the biggest complications after surgery and we’re just doing a clinical study right now, if we usually the patients usually arrive about five days before the surgery, and we give them a breather then. And we train them for five days, they have to use it. And then after excavation after the surgery, they go straight back onto it. And we’ve only have the first few patients in but it looks really, really nice so far that they really get out of the operation in much better shape. And they get excavated. So they stopped being intubated much earlier.

Trish Hammond
Okay, so so for example, like my dad had a pacemaker and I’ve noticed myself since he’s had it he’s definitely a lot shorter for breaks or something like this could actually really help him to get that breath because I can see he gets a bit anxious when it comes time to you know, with his breathing, I can see it myself.

Nina
Totally because the cardiopulmonary system is one system so the lungs and the heart Work together. If you have a heart problem, you also have a breathing problem. If you have a breathing problem, you might also have a heart problem. 64% of COPD patients also have heart failure. So it says this is really connected. So absolutely, if you’ve got a cardiac problem, you need to also look after your respiratory muscles and get your muscles in shape.

Trish Hammond
Yeah, look, it makes so much sense. It’s all connected. And I just want to because you, you talked about the post op pulmonary, what was it?

Nina
post operative pulmonary complications.

Trish Hammond
Cool. I’ll write that down. Then when I go back to do a bit more research. I’ll know what I’m talking about. Right? Okay, well then look back down. So interesting. And I’m just going to ask you one more question before we will. I will ask you two questions. But the other question I want to ask you so it’s never too late to start to look after your breath is it because even if even you know people in all people in you know, an old folks home or retirement villages what We like to call them or someone who’s in their 80s there’s nothing wrong with them starting like a breathing routine, you know as an exercise routine now it always there.

Nina
On the contrary, especially for elderly people, because it’s the breathing muscles you know that the diaphragm, that’s one thing, and this is they’re really affected. They looked at institutionalised elderly, so people in care homes and they found that 100% of them have respiratory muscle weakness. And that’s kind of because they’re not exercising anymore. They do get off quickly so they exercise even less so it’s kind of a vicious circle as well. So the one thing that they could all do is train the respiratory muscles and that would help with the breathlessness but also with dysphasia with the swallow problems that many of them have because, you know, you’re always there’s like, oh, the elderly, they get pneumonia more often. They do get pneumonia because the swallowing doesn’t work properly anymore. In elderly people, you can often tell that during a meal, they kind of swallow a bit harder that they have to clean their throat a lot more. And that’s because the swallowing muscles are not working 100% anymore when you get older, and using a respiratory muscle trainer, it also trains your laryngeal muscles up, they’re the muscles that are used for swallowing. And if you keep those in shape, then you’re just at a much lower risk of getting the aspiration. So that means getting food into your lungs. And if you and this is what causes the pneumonia, because you always if they aspirate during a meal and they cough of a choke a little bit worse, get a little bit of food in the lungs, and that just sits in the lungs then and if you get a respiratory pathogen in there, then you get the infection just because it’s that you already have have this this kind of nutritious food layer there which should get in there. So it would be a really good idea, especially for elderly people to train the respiratory muscles. Because of the swallowing problems as well. Mm hmm,

Trish Hammond
That sounds amazing. And the last thing I was going to ask you is some, of course, I really want to get this out, because I think this is something really important that peach should be aware of so that they can introduce it into their clinic. Because the thing is, even though you go to an aesthetic clinic, it’s about your wellness, you want to be you know, well and I know for a fact that the more air you get in, the younger you’re going to look, the more vibrant you’re going to be. It just makes so much sense that it goes hand in hand with it. So my question to you was going to be Will you come and join us one more time when I go into another group to run a zoom with a facebook live in the group there in the next week or so?

Nina
Of course, my pleasure, you’re wonderful, absolutely.

Trish Hammond
Wonderful. And when we do it, um, what I try, I’ll try and get up an hour earlier, we can do a little bit earlier, so it’s not too late for you, because you’re going to what do you do before you go to sleep now

Nina
and brush my teeth and I’ll see you all I like. I like to go to sleep with brain waves. I love that. They really count me down. So that works. It works quite nicely for me. Okay, so you put some earphones in and you just listen to brain waves.

Trish Hammond
Yeah, that would probably work for me too. Awesome. Well, I gotta say, thank you so much for joining me. I can’t tell you like ever since I spoke to you last week, I’ve been really excited about it. And today I’m even more excited as well. So because it’s almost like when someone tells you something and then the penny drops and you realize, Oh, my God like this. This one to me, I think this should be you know, this should be common knowledge, really,

Nina
it should become an alert. This is where I’m really happy to spread the word. You know, it should be common knowledge. And these are really simple things you know, breathing exercises, respiratory muscle trainers, there you know, that little things that are inexpensive, they’re cost effective, and everybody should know about them that you have the possibility to do something for yourself very easily. Exactly.

Trish Hammond
I agree. 100% I’m, I’m really looking forward to sharing this around. Look, I’m gonna send you an asset. Thank you so much for taking the time. I really appreciate it so much. I’ve spoken to you twice now. I can’t wait to speak to you again. Thank you.

Nina
Thank you. It was a pleasure.

Trish Hammond
Pleasure. So listeners Look, if you want to find out a bit more, you can drop me an email. I’m going to be doing a lot of research on this. I’m going to try and get these devices available here for you to purchase as well for your clinic, your patients for yourselves whatever you want. But yeah, you can just send me an email to trish@plasticsurgeryhub.com.au and I’ll be speaking to them in a regular place. Thank you so much for joining us today, Nina.

Nina
Thank you. Thank you. Bye, bye.

Trish

Trish is a plastic surgery blogger. She is passionate about wellbeing, health and beauty, and doesn't mind a little bit of 'help' from the amazing cosmetic and beauty procedures that are available today. Trish spends her days talking to women and men who are looking for suggestions and advice on procedures that are available to them. Cutting through the sales pitch and hype, a down-to-earth response on general information is what you will get.

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